The Tangled Sweater

This is a story about a girl who may or may not bear any resemblance to me. Let’s call her Shhhhhhara. Yeah. Shara.

On Friday, Shara was driving home from work, singing at the top of her lungs to the soundtrack from That Thing You Do (aka: Best Movie Ever). The afternoon was sunny and beautiful, but the air was cool enough to relieve the warmth. Shara lived for days like this. Having recently been diagnosed with Lupus, Shara had–as of late–been trying to dress in layers. The Upper Michigan weather had been so fluctuant, and layers helped her to manage the effects of the climactic extremes. On the day of our story, Shara had chosen a bright (not neon, but bold) pink three-quarter shirt under a lightweight black cabled sweater. Bold colors look great coupled with black, by the way.

So there was our girl, driving home from work with the windows down and the music blaring. She realized for the first time in a week that she was feeling good, and decided to celebrate by taking off her sweater. Now if you think that taking off a sweater while driving is a bad idea, you’re right. However, it is a well-established fact among Shara’s friends and family that she can do this without unbuckling her seat belt or taking her eyes off the road. It’s all about the steps, the process, she tells people. In fact, Shara has done this several dozen times in her life and has never had a problem or caused an accident.

Shara gripped the wheel with her left hand and carefully maneuvered her right arm out of the black sleeve. Leaving the right sleeve limp on her shoulder, she took the wheel in her dominant hand and slithered out of the weaker sleeve. All that remained was her head. She lifted the sweater over her head and —

TIGHT.

Not good, Shara. Not good.

She slowed her highway speed to 40mph. There was no one behind or before her, or she never would have attempted this in the first place. Shara glanced down and saw the problem. Her left sleeve was caught in the back of the seatbelt. No problem. She reached back and pulled it free, then tried to pull the sweater under the shoulder strap of the belt.

TIGHTER.

Really not good.

A car appeared in her rearview mirror long enough to signal before passing her. The other driver glanced as he passed, double-took, and then shook his head with a laugh as he cruised by. Shara finally did the smartest thing in this story.

She pulled over.

It was there, on the side of the road by Marquette Mountain, in a tangled sweater-seatbelt with the Shrimp Shack playing on the stereo that Shara had a beautiful, unexpected, ridiculous God-moment.

How often do we look at our lives and think we understand what God is doing? We think that our understanding enables us to correctly (and safely) behave in a way that will bring about the (assumed) end result. The truth is, just like Sarah in the Bible, when we try to make God’s promises come about on our own, we mess everything up. We cause ourselves more heartache and grief simply because we forget that God is the Author of our story. And when we realize that we’ve done it–that we’ve caused more trouble than we’re worth–there’s only one thing to do: Stop. Stop and Untangle.

In more than one regard, this is where I am in my life. I’m untangling a lot of things–music, writing, theology, poverty, purpose, love, family, health. I’m stopped. I am overwhelmed with the realization that I don’t understand any of it. I want to understand, and I thought I understood–but I don’t. I’m caught in my own sweater, and every wrong move tightens around my neck like a noose. You can understand, then, why it’s necessary for me to take time and not rush this process. I’ll get it all worked out. I know I will. I just can’t promise it’ll happen as quickly as it should. I have always needed to do things in my own time, and this is no different.

I’m so thankful that God allows us to pull over and untangle!

Pax,

Sarah

No sweaters were harmed in the writing of this blog post.

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2 Responses to The Tangled Sweater

  1. jarheaddoc says:

    This wad absolutely beautiful. My lord can you write. This story touched my heart so very much. Made me stop and do a lot of soul searching. You are fast becoming my hero. Lot of respect for you Sarah. Keep up the great work. Love you

  2. Steve Ward says:

    Oh what a tangled web we weave before we wearn to weave it awone!

    Hi Sarah,

    I’m glad that you,..er,…Shara got out of her twisted problem alright.
    Remember, I’m still praying for you!

    Shalom!!!

    Steve

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