The Quotable Floyd, part VI

I can’t tell you how much I love quoting Floyd. He’s witty. He’s real. He’s wise. And often, he’s witty, real, and wise all at once. This semester, we featured the music of British organist, choral director, and composer, Paul Ayres. In honor of Floyd’s retirement, we also commissioned a three-movement piece by Mr. Ayres. It was a fascinating and thrilling process, start to finish. The commissioned piece, The Harmony of Heaven and Earth, which I will write about on its own merit in the future, gave fuel to the Quote Machine.

If you’ve missed them in the past, please go back and read our Floyd quotes from previous semesters.

And now, without further adieu, I give you, once again, the Quotable Floyd, Paul Ayres edition:

  • There will be instances of choral collision.
  • Just smile and put air in the room and sing what you can.
  • You’re not paid by the note.
  • Maybe I should take you higher in warm-up. That’s what you call a choral threat.
  • The song is not over until silence fills the space.
  • We could do that. Or we could do that. We’ve gotta discover it. We’re excavating.
  • Floyd: And that’s just 3 bars!  Annette: We just don’t know which 3.
  • As you can see, [Paul] loves rhythmic displacement.
  • Don’t breathe, by the way.
  • [Paul] completely obliterated the downbeat.
  • If you want to see me make a mistake, then watch closely!
  • It doesn’t have chord changes so much as it has rhythmic energy.
  • Do your feelingful singing there.
  • If you sing the right vowel, the sun will shine down upon your face.
  • It’s too many dissonances in a row to analyze.
  • Feel a gentle alto arrival.
  • Ha! You thought you were gonna be in a key, didn’t you?
  • Let’s have a little Creative Responsibility. If you don’t have a note, don’t sing it
  • Get thee behind me, piano.
  • You’re not getting paid by the note.
  • Middle C is a terrible note; I’d like to ban it sometimes.
  • There aint’ no pitch there.
  • Dissonance leads to consonance, so it must be a whale of a consonance!
  • Now we’ve gotta sing with the guys from some other harmonic planet.
  • It’s a real dangerous thought—to think that a choir knows something too soon.
  • We’re gonna do this in tempo. No? I hear the sound of terrified silence.
  • If it sounds wrong, don’t assume it’s wrong. If it sounds right, don’t assume it’s right.
  • I recommend breathing.
  • Don’t wait for me to cue you if I’m wrong.
  • I shall offer you the beat.
  • I’m gonna have to do a standard illegible 7-beat.
  • Keep doing that! The ladies like that!
  • I’m trying to make it so weird that when we get it right, it’ll seem normal.
  • Yanno, I really do need to pay attention.
  • We’ve gotta run you into the G#.
  • I hear the sound of stunned silence.
  • I like breath in general.
  • You don’t typically see a beat going that way. It’s not normal. That’s okay—neither am I.
  • When we do slow, you shouldn’t practice late.
  • Everything we do is a release. It’s a preparation. If you release early, you will force the next thing. If you’re late, you’ll miss it.
  • It will be logical. Trust me.
  • The men need a pattern upon which to depend.
  • I have no idea what I’m talking about.
  • By itself, it seems deliciously easy.
  • I need to stop making noise, cause I can’t hear you.
  • This is gonna be a whole lot easier if you don’t read music.
  • I may not be exactly metrically perfect…but don’t tell anybody.
  • Oh, it’s good to learn the right way to do things.
  • I wish you were making the same error every time. That’d be easy.
  • That’s what rehearsal is for—to be out of sync once in awhile.
  • Don’t speed up to make up.
  • Sing only with the stick.
  • I’m so wrong, I’m amazed.
  • You’re lucky—you get me!
  • If you don’t write it, it goes away.
  • I’ve never seen music where I could violate it so thoroughly.
  • Be fearless in your breath and attack.
  • We’re gonna make all the music. We may not get it right, but we’re gonna make all the music.
  • Arrr? This is not “Sing Like A Pirate” day!
  • It’s only two beats in that flavor.
  • Rather than ‘and,’ I’d like you to have ‘and.’ Make a symbol for that.
  • There are three levels to conduct, and I only have two hands. I’ll have to roll my eyes or something.

Thanks for reading, my friends!

Pax Domini,

Sarah

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4 Responses to The Quotable Floyd, part VI

  1. Steve Ward says:

    Hi Sarah,

    I have been so busy these days, so it’s a relief to read your blogs while I sit here waiting for my wife to come and pick me up (We’re a “one-car-family” at the moment.)
    I was just reading the first few chapters of your “Becoming” novel within the last two days. I was wondering if you have been writing on it any more. I hope all is well with you and your family.
    My daughter is graduating from high school. She still hates me and doesn’t talk to me. She’s getting to be rude to the rest of the family, too. I hope she learns good manners while away at college.
    By the way, I get a kick out of Floyd, too.
    I’m still praying for you!

    Shalom!!!
    Steve

    • semmie says:

      Hi Steve;

      I’m sorry to hear that your daughter is behaving as she is. Perhaps college will help her to think about her actions. I don’t know. I know it doesn’t help much, but I hope you (and the family) find courage in the knowledge that most kids her age think they know everything and hate their parents. It won’t last forever. Keep loving her!

      I’m sorry to say I haven’t touched “Becoming” in ages. I’ve been swallowed up in work and relationships and Lupus. Writing has definitely taken a back seat. Also, I had some less than encouraging feedback from a couple of readers, so I chicken-ran. I haven’t worked on it since then. I’ve thought about it a lot, but…

      Take care of yourself. And please stop by when you’re able, even though I don’t blog very often anymore.

      Pax,
      Sar

  2. Steve Ward says:

    Hi Sarah,

    I’ll be praying for you- especially the Lupus. I have missed so many of your blogs because I have to limit personal time on the computer (Around lunch-time, if I take it.). So let me encourage you to try to at least think about “Becoming” and perhaps plan what your ending will be. Work towards that with just jotting down a few notes when you are resting. Maybe you can come up with some sort of outline to help you finish it.

    Remember that I am still praying for you!

    Shalom!!!
    Steve

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