Psalm 3

Psalm 3

1 Lord, how many are my foes!
How many rise up against me!
2 Many are saying of me,
“God will not deliver him.” Selah.

3 But you, Lord, are a shield around me,
my glory, the One who lifts my head high.
4 I call out to the Lord,
and he answers me from his holy mountain. Selah.

5 I lie down and sleep;
I wake again, because the Lord sustains me.
6 I will not fear though tens of thousands
assail me on every side.

7 Arise, Lord!
Deliver me, my God!
Strike all my enemies on the jaw;
break the teeth of the wicked.

8 From the Lord comes deliverance.
May your blessing be on your people. Selah.

Focus.
As I suspect will be the case in many of the psalms, it is not immediately clear where the focus of this prayer is. This is a psalm of David, when he was fleeing from Absalom, his son, and it begins with something of a desperate cry.

Almost immediately, the focus shifts from the many that surround David to the character of God. Verse 2 is pivotal. It speaks the question of whether God is willing to intervene and deliver David. Interestingly, it ends with that mysterious word we all love: Selah. Perhaps the best explanation I’ve read (though it is an idea, not a certainty) is that “selah” meant to pause. It allowed time for reflection before moving on.

Inserted here, we sense a tension. It is like a moment in fiction where our hero is considering whether to give up in despair or to press on in determination. It is a moment of decision. The question here is this: What does David believe? Does he listen to the doubters and scoffers? Are they right? Has God abandoned David to his foe?

And here is the pivot: “But you.” Suddenly, we hear the conviction in David’s tone. He is defying his doubt with statements of how God behaves. Relationally, the focus seems to be on David–how God behaves toward him. However, the focus is really God’s actions, not the recipient of His actions.

Music.
There are two things I’d like to point out here.

First, we have the first use of the word “Selah.” in the Psalms. What does the word mean? We may never know for certain, though I am partial to the idea of pause. If there is something theological about music, there must also be something at least worth noting about silence.

Second, the wording of verse 4. Notice that David doesn’t merely cry or pray or hope; he calls “out.” In the KJV, it is rendered, “I cried unto the Lord with my voice.” In the old NIV (the Bible I use), it reads, “To the Lord I cry aloud.” There is a definite sound attached to David’s plea. Is this intentional? I cannot say; only that sometimes in our greatest need, our greatest darkness, it helps to speak aloud, to let our voices break the silence.

It was God’s voice that broke the silence in Genesis, bringing all things into existence. Could He have created man with only His will, without His voice? Of course. He is God! But it should tell us something about God (and ourselves) that Creation comes from His voice.

As does David’s prayer.

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