Psalm 2

Psalm 2

1 Why do the nations conspire[a]
and the peoples plot in vain?
2 The kings of the earth rise up
and the rulers band together
against the Lord and against his anointed, saying,
3 “Let us break their chains
and throw off their shackles.”

4 The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
the Lord scoffs at them.
5 He rebukes them in his anger
and terrifies them in his wrath, saying,
6 “I have installed my king
on Zion, my holy mountain.”

7 I will proclaim the Lord’s decree:

He said to me, “You are my son;
today I have become your father.
8 Ask me,
and I will make the nations your inheritance,
the ends of the earth your possession.
9 You will break them with a rod of iron[b];
you will dash them to pieces like pottery.”

10 Therefore, you kings, be wise;
be warned, you rulers of the earth.
11 Serve the Lord with fear
and celebrate his rule with trembling.
12 Kiss his son, or he will be angry
and your way will lead to your destruction,
for his wrath can flare up in a moment.
Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

Focus.
This second psalm follows the manner of the first: It reads something more like a proverb or a piece of prophetic literature (i.e.: Isaiah) than what we typically think of as psalms. It is almost poetic narrative rather than prayer or worship.

The subject here is clearly man, if we take it at face value. The psalmist is speaking to people. I have no qualms about grouping this one in the “man” column.

Except that it is one of the Messianic psalms: It is prophetic. Any honest theologian must confess that he begrudgingly names the focus here as man and not the Savior of which it foretells. Still, for the simple purpose of this exercise, the subject is very pointedly man.

Music.
I am captured here by a phrase which may or may not partake in this study. ‘Rejoice with trembling.” In my more charismatic days, I confess that this was understood rather literally, as a moving of God’s Spirit. Even a more conservative view–for instance, that we are to worship with reverence and humility–may be lacking.

Before we can answer the question of what it means to rejoice with trembling, I think, we must ask what (if any) relationship exists between rejoicing and trembling. Our first inclination should be that they oppose one another (and in a faith full of paradox, this should not surprise us). You rejoice when you are happy; you tremble when you are afraid. I do admit, however, that this is not a steadfast rule. A child full of anticipation and excitement for Christmas morning may tremble, and it signifies joy, not fear or sorrow. Still, when we dig into this verse, we find that the Hebrew word does not denote joyful jitter; rather, it clearly depicts a fearfulness.

Maybe the psalmist is simply telling us to fear Him who can destroy us. It would not stretch the context of this psalm one bit. It is worth noting at this point that our God is clearly both our Wrath and our Refuge (another great paradox of God’s character).

Maybe only when we realize our own insignificance, maybe only when we fathom how frail we truly are, maybe then, in that outrageous and terrifying humility, can we begin to see what God truly accomplishes.

Maybe true rejoice must stem from such a dark and terrible place.

Maybe such a realization should shake us to our very core.

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