Psalm 4

Psalm 4

For the director of music. With stringed instruments. A psalm of David.

1 Answer me when I call to you,
my righteous God.
Give me relief from my distress;
have mercy on me and hear my prayer.

2 How long will you people turn my glory into shame?
How long will you love delusions and seek false gods?
3 Know that the Lord has set apart his faithful servant for himself;
the Lord hears when I call to him.

4 Tremble and do not sin;
when you are on your beds,
search your hearts and be silent.
5 Offer the sacrifices of the righteous
and trust in the Lord.

6 Many, Lord, are asking, “Who will bring us prosperity?”
Let the light of your face shine on us.
7 Fill my heart with joy
when their grain and new wine abound.

8 In peace I will lie down and sleep,
for you alone, Lord,
make me dwell in safety.

Focus.
Only four psalms into this project and already I am realizing that this is more difficult than I expected. Here, again, we see a shifting focus.

Verse one is focused on God’s actions. It is the understood “you.” [You] Answer me; [you] give me relief; [you] be merciful; [you] hear. David is speaking directly to God, and the focus is on how David desires for God to behave toward him. David is petitioning God, but his trust is in God to respond according to His holy attributes.

In verse two, suddenly, we are talking to men; but verse 3 immediately returns focus to God’s actions. David tells us how God behaves toward those He has set apart–specifically, that He hears when they call to Him.

Verses four and five are interesting. David is speaking again to men, telling them how to behave toward God. I’ll just note that herein are two of the most fascinating phrases in Scripture to me:

In your anger, do not sin;

Search your hearts and be silent.

The last three verses are clearly focused on God.

Music.
In the Psalm 3 writing, I said that if there is something theological about music, then there must be something worth noting about silence, also. Although, I’m reconsidering my thoughts about this. Think about the moment of Creation (regardless of how you believe it happened): I have always said that it was God’s voice that broke the silence and darkness. And that’s true, I think. (I think!) Except that silence and nothingness in the realm of mankind does not necessarily denote silence and nothingness in eternity. Before man, before Earth, before our universe, were the living creatures of Revelation 4 still crying, “Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God Almighty; who was and is and is to come”? If so, then even though there is silence in the world of created man, there is sound in eternity. That is a really mind-blowing idea, and I challenge you all to think about its implications.

I am fascinated by verse four: Search your hearts and be silent. I have no idea what this may imply. It suggests to me more of a contemplative or reflective meditation, rather than a cognizant prayer. In fact, it may be why we see that beautiful word “Selah” at the close of the statement. We often think that for God to hear our prayers, we must offer something coherent or articulate. I know I do! For me, it has a lot to do with the way I write, the way I process: I am often more verbal than I need to be, simply as an exercise of discovery. The more I say (or write), the more I understand what I’m really thinking or feeling, what the “right words” are, etc. Fortunately for myself, this has lead to a very abundant prayer world; unfortunately, it has meant that I struggle with silence.

Piano has helped. It isn’t silence, but it definitely allows me to focus and search without allowing my intellect to take over. It may be worth considering that in a noisy world, we could all use some silence–even in our prayers.

And here’s an added bonus.

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2 thoughts on “Psalm 4

  1. I love it; I so miss your contemplative writings and thoughts! I will come back and read more, as I’ve missed this since TWeb!

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