Atheism, part I

I’m thinking about Atheism today.

Whenever a Muslim says or does something offensive or outrageous, we find it necessary for non-extreme Muslims to come out and say, “We don’t condone this.”

Whenever a Christian says or does something offensive or outrageous, we find it necessary for non-extreme Christians to come out and say, “We don’t condone this.”

But when an Atheist says or does something offensive or outrageous, non-extreme Atheists are silent. And we don’t force the matter.

Why is that?

Forgive me. This is a very gross generalization based solely upon my limited (very, very limited) interactions with Christians, Muslims, and Atheists. In spite of the generalizations, it is an honest question.

Does anybody have an honest response? Is my limited observation skewed and incorrect? Or is there a double-standard at work here? Anybody? Anybody at all?

Perhaps on the morrow, I will tell you why this is on my mind. But then, perhaps no. We shall see.

Pax Christi.

I love you, Stan. And Proxy.

Sem.

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3 thoughts on “Atheism, part I

  1. Pingback: Atheism, part II: In the Name of Atheism « barefooted

  2. and who would a non extreme atheist be? If they are in the news it is typically because of that extremism.

    if the apology comes from someone other than the source (Xtian, muslim, or atheist)I don’t see how it helps, except as a way to distance yourself from a particular viewpoint.

  3. First of all, let me say…

    RAPTOR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    I am SO stoked to see you here. Have you been lurking?? Tsk. You know it’s almost Tiger time again… :D

    My point in this blog was exactly as you say–“a way to distance yourself from a particular viewpoint.” Religious people are often expected to do this, and I think it’s justifiable. I don’t mind standing up and saying that I find Todd Bentley absolutely WRONG, because I would hate for any non-Christian out there to walk away from Christianity thinking that we all believe healing comes by a kick in the face.

    Muslims know this, as well, especially in a post-9/11 America. Whenever an extremist Muslim speaks or acts, we want to hear from moderate, peaceable Muslims, affirming that hatred is an extreme distortion of their religion.

    My contention was that our society doesn’t seem to expect that of Atheists. I don’t expect anyone to apologize for one extremist’s statements, but it was discouraging to me to note the silence of several Atheists when these extreme statements were being made.

    Anyway…I’ll stop rambling…I need to go read your other comment so I can give you some points…

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